29.5.15

THE WHITE PROTESTANT ROOTS OF AMERICAN RACISM

While most modern American Christians flee from anything remotely resembling "racism," at least some liberals are willing to point out the connection between Christianity and racial realism.

In an article written for the New Republic entitled 'The White Protestant Roots of American Racism' author Alana Massey argues that the Protestant religion itself inspired the ideological justifications for slavery, segregation, and white identity.

Furthermore, she argues that even in contemporary times, white Christians are still more likely than the rest of the population to adhere to more conservative opinions about race relations:
"American society is heavily informed by this religious foundation, specifically in terms of racial injustice, even as religious identification declines. A recent poll conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute on police brutality showed that between December 2014 and April 2015 the percentage of white Americans who believed that police killings of black Americans were part of a broader pattern jumped from 35 percent to 43 percent. White evangelical Protestants, on the other hand, see the recent homicides as isolated incidents–62 percent of them said that police treat blacks and whites equally. This isn’t an accident of demographics; it springs from the religious framework that undergirds American societal values. To deny the ongoing influence of Protestant ethics is to be willfully ignorant."
Furthermore, Massey rightly observes that white racial consciousness (or "racism") has only begun to decline as American society has become more secular and godless. In other words, so called "racism" will only be eliminated when Christianity is no longer the dominant American faith.

The 1950s were the last era in which Christianity was a powerful hegemonic force in American society, interestingly, it was also the last time our society was racially segregated and U.S. immigration laws favored whites over various minorities.

Coincidence? Probably not. Most of the American founding fathers were faithful conservative Christians, and yet, they owned slaves and viewed whites as naturally worthy of leadership over blacks.

Early Americans realized that God created a natural hierarchy in nature. Some people are smarter than others, some people lead better than others, women and men have different roles. In the same way, if one race is genetically less intelligent, less capable of sustaining civilization, and more prone to crime and violence that race must be treated differently for the good of society. In fact, they cannot responsibly be treated the same.

The end of American slavery has led to the development of thousands of ghettos around the United States dominated by drugs, welfare dependence, and illiteracy. If white Christians would simply accept the world as God created it, rather than the egalitarian world they wish existed they would understand that racial integration is an illogical social organization.

The roots of "racism" in America were planted by a Christian faith which sought the truth in every area of life... including race relations.